WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Does Your Young Dog or Puppy Have Pain or Lameness?

dog_lameness_200.jpg
Pain and Lameness in Puppies or Young Dogs Need Speedy Attention

If your young dog or puppy experiences lameness, pain or discomfort in its legs or joints get prompt attention from your family's veterinarian.

A fever may accompany the pain or lameness.  Your puppy or young dog may seem lethargic and lack energy, enthusiasm or vitality.

These are important signs that your vet will need to know about.

Your dog's or puppy's bones could have interrupted or disturbed growth causing them this pain.  Getting a diagnosis early and following your veterinarian's treatment recommendations can help your pet cope with this disease.

Young puppies are expected to be full of life and energy.  They are enthusiastic about playtime, walks and exercise.  Puppies will often follow you wherever you go, can disrupt your nap or quiet time in their excitement to show you something new, and be always ready for playtime and fun.  When puppies and young dogs are lethargic and demonstrate pain and lameness in their legs, a visit must be made to your veterinarian promptly.

"A puppy that becomes acutely down and out with no specific signs causes extra concern because our expectation is that they are young, vibrant animals. There are two diseases that are only seen in puppies and young dogs that cause pain and lameness in multiple limbs and lethargy. They often have a fever and decreased appetite," advises veterinarian Christie Long.

Hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD) usually affects puppies between 2 and 8 months old.  It is a developmental disease of the bone that occurs when blood supply to the bone's growth plates is disturbed.  This disturbance can impede production of bone, cause weakening and microscopic fractures.

Panosteitis is another condition that could be present in puppies and young does, suggests Dr. Long.  It typically occurs in large and medium-breed dogs that are younger than two.  "Hypertrophic osteodystropy produces similar signs in even younger dogs, but the pain is localized in the region at the end of those bones and the joint itself. These animals often have joints that are very warm to the touch and swollen," she indicates.  Dr. Long further shares that both diseases have been extensively studied.  Doctors are still looking for a specific cause and suspect that not feeding foods formulated specifically for large-breed dogs can be a contributing factor in patients with HOD.

Household breeds commonly affected by hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD) include:  Saint Bernards, Doberman pinschers, German shepards, Weimaraners, Great Danes and Irish wolfhounds.  Hazel Gregory's Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy or a Blood Infection shares her experiences with the challenges of identifying HOD while eliminating blood infection in her Great Danes.

Pain and lethargy in your young dog or puppy should be taken seriously and treated promptly by a veterinarian.  Dehydration and serious complications can occur if treatment is delayed.  Be sure to visit your family veterinarian speedily.  During the visit with your family veterinarian, you'll be asked questions about your pet's current habits.  Your vet will ask about appetite and eating habits.  Other questions will include weight loss, fatigue, or lack of energy that you've noticed in your puppy.  Your vet will examine your puppy or young dog for fever, swelling and check for pain in the legs.  The doctor will determine if the discomfort or pain is severe and will pinpoint the location of pain in your dog's bones.  During your visit, your veterinarian will talk with you about treatment recommendations for your puppy or young dog.

Exclusive Offer

Return of the Rattlesnake Vaccination!

South Valley Animal Clinic is excited to announce the return of the Red Rock Biologics Rattlesnake Vaccination!  This vaccination is great for dog's planning on hiking, camping or just exploring the bosque.  Please call our office for scheduling or more information (505) 873-2590. 

THIS ---->https://southvalleyanimalclinic.com/index.php

Business Hours

Day
Monday8:30-12:001:30-5:30
Tuesday8:30-12:001:30-5:30
Wednesday8:30-12:00CLOSED
Thursday8:30-12:001:30-5:30
Friday8:30-12:001:30-5:30
Saturday8:30-12:00CLOSED
SundayCLOSEDCLOSED
Day
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
8:30-12:00 8:30-12:00 8:30-12:00 8:30-12:00 8:30-12:00 8:30-12:00 CLOSED
1:30-5:30 1:30-5:30 CLOSED 1:30-5:30 1:30-5:30 CLOSED CLOSED


South Valley Animal Clinic Joins PACA's New Public Spay/Neuter Program

We are excited to announce our support of the 'Fix the 505' program.  Fix the 505 is a small scale FREE spay/neuter program for low income pet owners.  PACA (People's Anti-Cruelty Association) selected a few local veterinarian clinic's, including South Valley Animal Clinic to participate in this necessary program.  Please watch the short video above or visit http://paca-aar.org/index.php/donate/sponsor-a-spay for more information!

06/01/2015 UPDATE

This program has been restricted to South Valley residents struggling to spay or neuter their pets.  In order to get your pets scheduled, please request a PACA Voucher from The Animal Humane Society or from a Bernalillo County Animal Control officer .  Please call (505) 255-5523 for more information!

Testimonials

Dr. Heite and the rest of SVAC staff, Thank You! From the bottom of our hearts for your AMAZING care for our dogs. You're an awesome team, and we trust you above anyone else to provide immediate, compassionate, and reliable solutions. We cannot begin to thank you for going above and beyond to help Sissy. We know she has an amazing medical team. 

With heartfelt appreciation, Sanchez Family
Albuquerque, NM

Newsletter Sign Up